Mandeville, LA - Exclusive Transcript - The beginnings of Skynet are very real, they’re not fictional, and they’re very terrifying.  The fact that you people in Texas are going to have tens of thousands of unmanned aerial vehicles just roaming the countryside in search of an illegal, how do they know it’s an illegal? Check out today's audio and transcript for the rest...

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Begin Mike Church Show Transcript

Mike:  “New border security relies heavily on drones to hunt illegal immigrants.”  How many of you are familiar with Skynet?  Skynet is the fictional agency that came around in -- I don’t know the exact year.  I suppose if you’re a Terminator buff you know.  Skynet is basically the network of drones, unmanned aerial surveillance vehicles and attack vehicles that acquired some manner of intelligence and decided: All we have to do is alter our targets from these drug smugglers to those guys in government vehicles and start blowing government entities to kingdom come, then manufacture a couple robots out there to marshal the people together and tell them if they resist us they’ll all die.  Boom, you’ve got Terminator.

The beginnings of Skynet are very real, they’re not fictional, and they’re very terrifying.  The fact that you people in Texas are going to have tens of thousands of unmanned aerial vehicles just roaming the countryside in search of an illegal, how do they know it’s an illegal?  How do they know it’s not a cattle rancher that’s just cashing some cow that got out and crossed the river and needs to be brought back?  That’s really the least of the concerns.  How do you also know, when the drone is flying back and forth between the base, that it’s not flying over your house?  How do you know that local enforcement is currently using these unmanned aerial drones to spy on its own citizenry?

What very dark, scary times we live in, folks.  I do not believe that men appreciate the danger posed by the abandonment of humanity in favor of the embrace of the machine.  We already see our children and many of us meandering about various countryside or rural landscapes, eyes fixated on a 2.5”x5” video screen called a smartphone, just staring away at that thing.  What could possibly be on that?  What is it that’s so interesting?  [mocking] “It’s my Twitter feed.  It’s my Facebook.  It’s my Instagram.  It’s my Pinterest.”  If you go to a coffee shop these days -- AG, when you were a lil chi’rens, if you had ventured into a coffee shop in the DC area in the 1990s when you were growing up, you would have seen people reading what?  What would they have been holding in their hands and reading?

AG:  The Washington Post.

Mike:  Or a book.  Do you remember those things, books?  They’re made out of paper.  They come with binding and stuff.  I catch myself sometimes going, “Come on, it’s lunchtime.  Put the damn phone down.  No, I am not taking a picture of my food and sending it out to my Twitter followers.”  Ray Bradbury, before he died, talked about this.  He said: Stop making machines.  The man who wrote Fahrenheit 451, which is about book burning, which basically we have today in earnest in favor of digitizing, said: Stop making machines.  What if he was onto something?

[reading]

The immigration overhaul framework top senators released Monday relies heavily on more drones to patrol the border with Mexico as a key way to control the flow of illegal immigrants.

[end reading]

Mike:  You have to ask the question, ladies and gentlemen, what are the illegal immigrants coming here for?  I know many of you are going to say, [mocking] “They took our jobs.  They’re coming here to steal our jobs.”  Are they coming here for your job, per se?  Do they want to move into your house?  Do they want to take over your neighborhood?  Most of the illegals that I see running around the countryside here in Mandeville, Louisiana or on the outskirts of New Orleans I don’t believe are trying to take over anyone’s neighborhood or constitute an invasion force.  What are they here for?  What exactly are they here for?  They are here for an opportunity that does not exist from whence they came.  They are here to actually exchange labor for cash.  In their socialist country of Mexico, there is a shortage of productive labor because they are socialist and very controlled.  We are less socialist here so there is opportunity here to acquire cash.  They cannot acquire cash in significant numbers in Mexico, so they come here to acquire it.

What exactly is the problem?  The problem is that the illegal immigrant is willing to work for what he needs to survive.  He is willing to work for a wage that he and ten others can cobble their money together, stay in a one- or two-bedroom apartment for six months to a year on end, go and shop at Wal-Mart every other Saturday for supplies, then take all the money they make and do what with it?  What do you think your average illegal immigrant does with his money?  Most of them do what with it?  They send it back from whence they came.  They are supporting families.  Some of them choose: Hey, man, it’s so good here, maybe I ought to stay here permanently, and then triple dog break the law by immigrating wives, sisters, brothers, mothers, you name it.  Then they double down on the first transgression of law.

The first thing you ought to establish is motive.  What is the motive of the illegal?  Of course, there’s the other brand of illegal that doesn’t want to work, that has just heard about these vainglorious welfare programs we have here and all the money we give away and you don’t have to do anything to get it other than not speak English, not assimilate into a culture, demand this thing called multiculturalism, sue Americans for use of their own facilities.  Of course, this has been made possible by what?  Federal laws enforced by federal judges that are unconstitutional.

It is without question that the policing of alien friends in any given state was a matter left to state governments and state legislatures.  Every time a state tries to say: Not another dime.  We will kick you out.  You don’t belong here.  You don’t get anything.  You don’t get any schooling.  You don’t get any medicine.  You get nothing.  Then the Feds come along and say: Hey, we’ve got a Civil Rights Act.  Those people want to be citizens.  You’ve got to treat them like you treat everybody else.  Again, that is not the ratified intent or position that a state ought to be having to do business or deal with this problem under.

Now, in order to fix the problem that the feds have created, the Feds are now going to grow the size of the spyfare state.  They’re going to grow the cyber and drone warfare state.  They create the problem and now they’re going to fix the problem by tyrannizing the rest of us, having these drones flying all over hell and creation under the auspices or allegedly to spy and figure out where the illegals are crossing.  Do you buy that?

[reading]

"Our legislation will increase the number of unmanned aerial vehicles," the senators said in their framework. The proposal doesn't say how many drones… [Mike: Of course it doesn’t say how many. We’re the U.S. government. We don’t have to give you any numbers. We need 100; we’ll make 120. We need 300; we’ll make 420.  What do we do with the rest? I don’t know. Fly ‘em over some clown pot grower’s house in Kentucky.] And the Homeland Security Department's inspector general has reported that U.S. Customs and Border Protection's current drone program is chaotic and the agency can't keep its drones flying at the rate it had promised. [Mike: They can’t keep up with the unmanned aerial vehicles they have. Let’s make more, shall we? What a wonderful idea. What could possibly go wrong.]

The agency didn't even budget for enough maintenance money to repair broken drones. "CBP risks having substantially invested in a program that limits resources and its ability to achieve [its] mission goals," the inspector general said earlier this month. Border security is a critical part of any immigration bill. In 2007, voters' fears that the border was not yet secure helped sink a push by President George W. Bush and top senators to pass immigration reform. [Mike: Again, I thought we fixed this in 1986. The fly in the ointment is that the federal leviathan continues to grow and make it nearly if not impossible for small-business people to survive unless they could hire labor for cash, in other words free market labor.] But a recent Government Accountability Office report found that the Border Patrol still captures only about 60 percent of all estimated illegal border crossers…

[end reading]

Mike:  So, another effort that’s going to result in not fixing the problem and is further going to eviscerate and emasculate the states.  It will eviscerate state prerogative and state police powers to deal with this, and it will emasculate state government from implementing the laws they currently have on their books.  Wonderful.  This is exactly how a federal system is supposed to work.  Oh, don’t worry, we can fix it.  Let’s just elect more Republicans.  Weren’t there Republicans standing up there with Schumer yesterday?

End Mike Church Show Transcript