Mandeville, LA – Exclusive Transcript – There’s a new book out called Politics on a Human Scale: The American Tradition of Decentralism.  It’s published by Lexington Books.  Dr. Jeff Taylor is the author.  I read part of this essay to you last week and I’ve referred to it a couple other times last week.  Dr. Taylor is on the Dude Maker Hotline, making his first visit here.  Dr. Jeff Taylor, welcome to the program, sir.  Check out today’s transcript for the rest…

 

Begin Mike Church Show Transcript

Mike:  There’s a new book out called Politics on a Human Scale: The American Tradition of Decentralism.  It’s published by Lexington Books.  Dr. Jeff Taylor is the author.  I read part of this essay to you last week and I’ve referred to it a couple other times last week.  Dr. Taylor is on the Dude Maker Hotline, making his first visit here.  Dr. Jeff Taylor, welcome to the program, sir.  How are you?

Is Davis a Traitor? In Paperback, get it signed by the Editor!

Is Davis a Traitor? In Paperback, get it signed by the Editor!

Dr. Jeff Taylor:  I am good, Mike.  I’m glad to be with you.

Mike:  My pleasure.  First of all, congratulations on the book and on the chosen subject matter.  Why did you choose human scale?  Were you influenced at all by Kirkpatrick Sale?

Taylor:  Not directly.  I’ve read his writings over the years here and there.  Partly I realized that his book Human Scale, which came out some years ago, actually contains a chapter entitled “Politics on a Human Scale,” which I had not actually read.  If anything, it’s a shortcoming on my part.  I guess the intellectual circles I hang out in, “politics on a human scale” has almost become a cliché, which is why I was shocked, when I did a book search, to find that there wasn’t one having that title already.  I was kind of tapping into, I guess, the currents of the folks I hang out with.  Kirkpatrick Sale certainly has been an influence in that.

Mike:  In the brief essay that our mutual friend Peter Haworth published at NomocracyInPolitics.com, which is an up-and-coming website, ladies and gentlemen.  We can get into the definition of nomocratic versus what Bradford called teleocratic, but it’s morning drive radio and I know you people are in a hurry.  Let’s just get to the heart of the matter here.  You quoted some stuff in the essay you posted that I had never heard of.  I had never read this letter that was published by Brutus, who you think was Judge Yates.  How do we think that it’s Judge Yates, if you don’t mind my asking?

Taylor:  Well, Robert Yates was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention.  In fact, he was one of three from the State of New York.  Alexander was the other.  Two of the delegates from New York State, in the end, refused to sign the Constitution because they believed it was taking too much power away from the states and away from the people.  They feared centralization.  This was the sort of thing that Yates, those positions -- he was an antifederalist.  He held those positions.  He argued at the ratifying convention in New York against adoption of the Constitution because of those fears.  I’m relying basically on scholars who have said: We don’t know for sure who wrote those Brutus essays -- at the time they would have been newspaper editorials against ratification -- but the suspicion is that it was probably Yates who did that.

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