The Mike Church Show World HQ
The Mike Church Show World HQ
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The Spirit of ’76 Audio CD & Video DVD Combo takes you on an entertaining & educational ride through the writing & ratifying of the Constitution!

Mandeville, LA – Exclusive Transcript This is where John Taylor gets into: “Okay, well, you guys lied to us.  You said that if we signed on the dotted line and adopted this Constitution gizmo that you would conduct your affairs in a certain way, and that we would conduct our affairs in a certain way, and that those were the rules we were all going to live by.  You lied because you’re not conducting your affairs like that.  And you’re telling other people that you don’t have to conduct your affairs like that.”  This is where he’s calling the nationalists out.  Bear in mind, this is a mere 20 years after the Constitution has been in effect, and there’s ample evidence that the smart men of the time were saying: Get out of this.  Get rid of it.  Get rid of it while we can or else it will prove to be a snare around free men’s necks.   Check out today’s transcript for the rest….

Begin Mike Church Show Transcript

Mike:  John Taylor of Caroline County, to me, again, far, far exceeds the intellect and the reasonability of even Jefferson.  He far better understood the things that were at stake if republicanism were not restrained.  And he also understood, unlike Jefferson and Madison, he understood, as Luther Martin did, as John Dickinson did, as Charles Carroll of Carrollton did, as ….

[private |FP-Monthly|FP-Yearly|FP-Yearly-WLK|FP-Yearly-So76|FP-Founding Brother|FP-Founding Father|FP-Lifetime]

John Witherspoon did, and as several other founders, though not enough — and Patrick Henry understood this.  Not only did Henry understand it, Henry lamented that it was not happening and probably was not going to happen.  See: Patrick Henry American Statesman, the book that I edited, and it’s always available in paperback right now at the Founders Tradin’ Post at MikeChurch.com.

What Taylor saw was that if we detach, if the American sheeple — of course, he didn’t call them sheeple back then.  If the American sheeple detach from their God-fearing moorings, and from the fact that the Constitution is but a subsidiary of an ultimate higher power, that there would not be a force on Earth that could constrain it.  Folks, that is exactly what has happened.  That is exactly and precisely what has happened.  [mocking] “That’s just your opinion.”  I think that the arc of history shows that that’s precisely what happened.  There were those that warned about it and said: You can’t just have a government created as a secular entity with no higher authority over it and not expect that men who will accept no higher authority over them are not going to use that government and its document for their own deceitful and despicable designs.  That is precisely what has happened.  It is precisely what is happening today.

Folks, please don’t kid yourselves.  There is no vote, no occurrence of any event at a ballot box that is going to alter that, none, none.  Yet say what I just said in a crowded room and [mocking] “(snoring) When are you gonna get back to bashing Obama? (snoring).”  Either that or, [mocking] “You know what, Mr. Church?  You and your buddy David Simpson and your other buddies and your buddy Chris Ferrara, you can take your son of man character and his dad and your spirit or ghost or whatever the heck you guys think, you can take all that and stick it.  You’re not going to ruin our good time, buddy, because we believe in one lord, the Constitution, the almighty, the maker of all that is seen and unseen.  We believe in one president.”  I can take the Nicene Creed and just turn it into the pledge, the misplaced, sick, secular pledge that too many people would be all too willing to take today.  So here’s what Taylor of Caroline wrote to people who were saying things to him like you people are saying to me:

[reading]

The Constitution of the United States was found chiefly upon the principle of a division of power, but the party which had lost the principal of balance became its administrators. Mr. Adams’s book, written in reference to state constitutions, disclosed sundry strong tinctures of the principle of balancing power, arising from English habits of thinking, and contended for others which did not exist; and the book called the Federalist, whilst it discussed with vast ability the particular subject of the proposed union, incidentally disclosed an opinion, that a balance of power was the basis of the new government. Under these impressions, the administrations of the general government began to act. The denominations of both the parties were bestowed by the predominant federal, which implied a division of power, was given to the admirers of the principle of balances, which implied a consolidated government. Antifederal to the admirers of the principle of division and several measures to place, either from a conviction that it was really founded in the principle of balances, or that it would be wise gradually to conduct it to that principle.

[end reading]

Mike:  When he’s talking about balances, he’s talking about Madison, checks and balances, the famous checks and balances statement.  By the way, how’s that working out for us?  Back to John Taylor, 1809.

[reading]

The party, which had chiefly framed the constitution but lost its administration, commenced an opposition on the ground that certain public measures tended towards consolidation, or a destruction of the principle of division; and in the course of controversy, Mr. Madison, said to have been one of the authors of the Federalist . . .

[end reading]

Mike:  This is cool because no one knows who wrote the Federalist at this time.  Even though Hamilton had leaked out to his attorney a list of who wrote what Federalist when he went to go meet Aaron Burr on the cliffs of Weehawken — Hamilton thought: I don’t know, this Burr guy might just actually shoot me and kill me, so I’m going to leave a note behind.  I’m trying to remember the name of the guy, Edgar — it’ll come to me in a moment here.  He stuffed it in a book that he knew his friend often referred to and would find, and he did find it.  So they don’t know who wrote the Federalist at this point.

[reading]

. . . Mr. Madison, said to have been one of the authors of the Federalist, separated from his associations in that work, and with many other gentlemen, undoubtedly from conviction, became, in the party dialect of the times, an antifederalist.  His defense of the resolutions of the Virginia Assembly and the instructions of the state senators which grew out of it furnishes the following extracts, explanatory of the principles of the party he had joined. [Mike:  Then he goes into some detail on Madison’s report of 1800, which you can read for yourself. I’m going to skip that part.]

This tendency would always be seen if the nation would keep its eyes steadily fixed upon the principles it has established for the preservation . . .

[end reading]

Mike:  Let me just back up.  This is where Taylor gets into: Okay, well, you guys lied to us.  You said that if we signed on the dotted line and adopted this Constitution gizmo that you would conduct your affairs in a certain way, and that we would conduct our affairs in a certain way, and that those were the rules we were all going to live by.  You lied because you’re not conducting your affairs like that.  And you’re telling other people that you don’t have to conduct your affairs like that.  This is where he’s calling the nationalists out.  Bear in mind, this is a mere 20 years after the Constitution has been in effect, and there’s ample evidence that the smart men of the time were saying: Get out of this.  Get rid of it.  Get rid of it while we can or else it will prove to be a snare around free men’s necks.  That’s me interpreting this because he does get a little verbose.  I think this is one of the easier Taylor passages.  Remember, this is the brains of the Virginia dynasty.  Taylor is the brains behind Jefferson, Madison and Monroe, especially Monroe and Jefferson. [/private]

Mike Church's own blend, hand rolled in the U.S.
Mike Church’s own blend, hand rolled in the U.S.

[reading]

This tendency would always be seen if the nation would keep its eyes steadily fixed upon the principles it has established for the preservation of its liberty, unblended by the merits of individuals, an indignation against foreign nations or the prejudices of party spirit.  If it embarks upon the tempestuous ocean of passion, it will become the victim of its own folly; and for a momentary gratification of its feelings, destined by nature soon to change or subside, it will destroy that system of division of power upon the preservation of which its permanent happiness depends.

[end reading]

Mike:  In other words, the very moment — let me translate that for you.  Taylor needs a translator sometimes.  The very moment the American system stops honoring the system of republican rule it established by adopting the Constitution — in other words, the moment the states become the slaves and but the satellite offices of the central, of the federal, it’s over.  The game is over.  Once the passions of men take over, it’s over.  There is no turning back.  If only he had lived long enough to see this sadly come to fruition.

End Mike Church Show Transcript

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