Definition of [r]epublicanism From Thomas Jefferson Letter to John Taylor of Caroline

In this Project ’76 version of a letter to John Taylor, Thomas Jefferson explains [r]epublicanism as he understands and promotes it.

$3.99 $3.99

If you purchase this item you'll earn... 19
Compare
SKU: BH-DL76-0001 Category: Tags: , ,

Description

Here is a sample of this letter Project ’76 Webisode of “Thomas Jefferson to John Taylor-Letter”. 



Mandeville, LA
 – By Mike Church –“We are all [r]epublicans now.” This is the Newsweek Magazine cover I hope to see someday but first we will need to educate many millions on just what [r]epublicanism is, why their Founding Parents said it was the best form of government and how they defined it. In this letter to John Taylor, Thomas Jefferson explains [r]epublicanism as he understands and promotes it.

It is also enjoyable to read Jefferson’s delight in Taylor’s “pulverizing” of John Adams’ “Defence of the Constitutions” book because according to DeceptiCON mythology: all the Founders agreed on almost everything and when they didn’t they still supported each other in every thing they did. This letter adds more fuel to the fire of the very private yet very heated feud between John Adams & Thomas Jefferson.

=============About Project ’76=================

Mandeville, LA – Popular radio talk show host & acclaimed writer/producer/director Mike Church (Road to Independence-The Movie) announced the launch of his latest initiative in American history based entertainment: Project ‘76™.

Project ‘76™ will employ the talents of Church as writer & director as well as the voice talents of Jean Hetherington and Steve Cook (Spirit of ’76, What Lincoln Killed) two of the voice industry’s best talents. “The concept of Project ‘76™ is very simple” Church said “we will take our already extensive collection of letters, speeches, debates and public acts from the Project ‘76™ timeline of 1765-1865 and dramatize them for audio delivery via mp3 digital downloads. Think of it as iTunes™ for American History buffs.”

Highlights from this feature:

“Monticello May 28, 1816

DEAR SIR,

— On my return from a long journey and considerable absence from home, I found here the copy of your “Enquiry into the principles of our government,” which you had been so kind as to send me; and for which I pray you to accept my thanks. You have successfully and completely pulverized Mr. Adams’ system of orders, and his opening the mantle of republicanism to every government of laws, whether consistent or not with natural right. Indeed, it must be acknowledged, that the term republic is of very vague application in every language. Witness the self-styled republics of Holland, Switzerland, Genoa, Venice, Poland. Were I to assign to this term a precise and definite idea, I would say, purely and simply, it means a government by its citizens in mass, acting directly and personally, according to rules established by the majority; and that every other government is more or less republican, in proportion as it has in its composition more or less of this ingredient of the direct action of the citizens. Such a government is evidently restrained to very narrow limits of space and population. I doubt if it would be practicable beyond the extent of a New England township.” Th Jefferson